Posted: 12:21 pm Sunday, March 30th, 2014

John I. Leonard AD Scott Siegel suffers broken bones in fall 

By Anthony Chiang

For the first time in a long time, Scott Siegel will have to slow down.

The John I. Leonard athletic director, who is known as one of the hardest working men in the business, is recovering from a fall in the school’s gymnasium that left him with a broken right shoulder and two broken fingers on his left hand Wednesday. ESPN 106.3 in West Palm Beach first reported the incident.

“For somebody like myself, who is very active, it’s hard to be basically shut down from doing things,” Siegel said. “The only good thing is that I still have my senses and I can talk. “

Doctors told Siegel it could have been worse, as the 59-year-old fell from a set of bleachers 15-20 feet above the floor in an attempt to check on a new mural being painted in John I. Leonard’s gymnasium. The mural reads, “Home of the Lancers.”

“I can’t tell you if I got my foot stuck or if I slipped, but I just came tumbling down from the top row of the bleachers all the way down,” Siegel said. “I hit the basketball floor right underneath the basket and I landed on my shoulder and my hand.”

According to Palm Beach County School District policy, Siegel will have to keep away from John I. Leonard for seven to 10 days because he was injured on school property.

Siegel dealt with a similar issue when former Lancers football coach Wayne Monroe suffered a shattered elbow in an on-campus accident on Aug. 24, 2012, forcing him to miss the team’s first six games of the 2012 season.

But Siegel is hoping he won’t have to stay away from the school for too long. He’s eager to get back to work, even coordinating the team buses and gate attendants from home.

“I have to go back Friday to make sure the bones are healing properly and then they will reevaluate it again,” he said. “I’m hoping that in a week to 10 days, I’ll at least be able to go back to some sort of work. The good thing is that the school is in capable hands and I can still do everything from home.”

Siegel will not have to undergo surgery for his injuries unless his recovery does not go well. This incident marks the first time he has broken a bone or suffered a serious injury on the job.

“I don’t know what the word slow means,” he said. “I understand that I can’t do certain things with my hands right now. But I have all my mental capacity, which is the thing that I’m thankful for.”